A new study from Ryerson University has shown that of the 101 single-use wipes it tested, including 23 labelled as flushable by the manufacturer, none were in fact safe to dispose of down the toilet.

The report, produced by Ryerson’s Flushability Lab at Ryerson Urban Water and entitled “Defining ‘Flushability’ for Sewer Use, is the first test of single-use wipes against rigorous criteria for flushability.

Results showed that not one single wipe was able to fall apart or disperse safely through the sewer system test, which can negatively impact household plumbing, municipal sewage infrastructure, and consequently, the environment.

Image result for flushable wipes

EnergySavingGadgets0327

As consumers look for energy-saving products to help the environment and save money, manufacturers are offering more “green” gadgets than ever before. But not all are worth the money, and some are an outright waste. Here are the top gadgets available that are actually worth the price to help you live green and save money while you're at it!

The Province of British Columbia first introduced energy efficiency as a BC Building Code objective in 2008. Ever since, designers and builders have had the option to use either “prescriptive” or “performance” approaches to comply with the code’s efficiency requirements.

To date, the vast majority of builders in British Columbia have pursued the prescriptive approach. Following this approach, buildings must meet specific requirements for insulation, windows, furnaces, water heaters, lighting and other equipment and systems. It focuses on individual elements, rather than ensuring the building functions well as a system. The result can be a building that does not perform as well as intended.

Builders have a second option to comply with the energy-efficiency requirements of the BC Building Code: the performance approach. The BC Energy Step Code offers a specific form of this approach.